The Allman Brothers Are Born

Allman_Brothers

L to R: Berry Oakley, Duane Allman, Dickey Betts, Butch Trucks, Jaimoe Johanson, Gregg Allman, Phil Walden

Baron recently received a phone call from a picture editor asking about his 1969 panoramic photograph of the Allman Brothers in a Macon, Georgia, recording studio. In March of that year while on assignment for Rolling Stone, Baron had indeed photographed the band during its first week of rehearsals together as the six piece group that manager/promoter Phil Walden helped launch. But Baron didn’t even have a panoramic camera at the time. It turned out that Phil Walden had created his own ‘panoramic’ by framing together the two prints Baron had given him. In March 2012, more than forty years later, this rendition of the Allman Brothers panoramic photo was created, a very limited edition, historically significant, print which you now have the opportunity to own.

Editions are available as follows:
24×16 inches, edition of 75
44×24 inches, edition of 15

Click here to inquire.

Photo Review

Jimi Hendrix, New York City, 1970

Australian magazine Photo Review just published an interview they recorded during the Antipodean leg of the Rolling Stone Years Cosmic World Tour. Some of the highlights:

PR: You’ve said that often you’d come away from shooting a concert and remember almost nothing of what had happened. Why is that?

BW: You had to be totally involved in the photographic moment. There was no autofocus, no auto-exposure, no auto-winders. Everything was done manually and you had to think it out in advance before you did anything. On stage the lights were always changing, and that meant the correct exposure was always changing too. I had a spot meter that looked like a machine-gun almost. I’d point it at the musician hoping that the reading I got then would kind of stay that way for awhile, you know. That was before there ever was a meter in the camera itself.

PR: So your mind is filled with the technical challenges while you’re shooting, then you come out of it and discover what you’ve done?

BW: Well, I knew that I could turn it on and off. I had to actually stop thinking actively about what I was doing and just let it come to me. You know, I felt like I was a conduit for these images to come through – wherever they were coming from – through me to the camera. I felt like I didn’t play a major role in it – obviously I did – but I felt somehow disconnected… I didn’t feel like I was responsible for the pictures; although obviously I was.

Govinda Gallery & Columbus Museum

Director of Development Donna Atkins, Curator of Education Abbie Edens, Curator of Collections and Exhibitions Kristen Miller Zohn, and Guest Curator Chris Murray with Baron’s photograph of Janis Joplin.

‘Sound and Vision: Monumental Rock & Roll Photography’ just opened in Columbus, Georgia. Our friends at Govinda Gallery “…have been working for several years developing this touring exhibition with the Columbus Museum. This exhibition represents much of our work championing significant photographs documenting rock & roll, hip hop, and blues music.”

Baron has photographs of Janis Joplin and Mick Jagger in the show and says “it is a really terrific and unpretentious exhibit which celebrates the power and quality of the images, an exhibit of which I’m very proud to be a part.” See Govinda for details.