Tiny Tim

Tiny Tim, Los Angeles, 1968

Baron will make one stop in Los Angeles on the Cosmic World Book Tour on July 14th. Hosted by the Duncan Miller Projects Gallery, Baron will be signing copies of the Rolling Stone Years book.

The book is packed with personal stories. We’re sharing snippets here to encourage you to buy it!  “I was worried about how this session might turn out. Tiny was a mercurial eccentric, as eccentric as Zappa but in a different way, so we had to figure out a way to put him at ease; you don’t put Tiny at ease the way you put somebody else at ease, right? So we bought a bouquet of daisies and said, ‘Tiny this is for you,’ and he went crazy, he held them to his chest and he kept smiling and thanking us, smiling and thanking.”

Rock Art Show

Hell’s Angels en route to the Altamont Speedway, Livermore, CA, 1969

The Cosmic Book Tour continues in Cleveland, Ohio. July 8 – 10 Baron will be at the Legacy Village in Lyndhurst, signing copies of his new book in conjunction with the dudes at Rock Art Show and local station Majic 105.7. However you can get there, get there if you can!

Every Picture Tells A Story

Rolling Stone Magazine’s Special Summer Double Issue is now on newsstands. “New book from mag’s first chief photog reveals the height of Sixties rock” features two pages of tales and photos.

The article will be on rollingstone.com soon. Remember, you can order a limited edition of the book now, with the regular copy available to pre-order. Just see our ‘Buy now‘ section!

Grace Slick

Grace Slick, San Francisco, 1968

Times do change – “I asked Grace to pose for me in her Girl Scout vest. From that session I got one particularly perfect, really cool photo of her, one that years later, when she started painting, she used as the basis for one of her canvases as well as her website logo.”

Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix, Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, 1968

“We interviewed him before the concert. He was so quiet!”

Jimi was one of Baron’s absolute favorites to photograph. He always dressed well, he was so photogenic, he was an incredible performer… Read more about shooting Jimi and how Baron sees the music in the new book “The Rolling Stone Years”. “You’d have to work really hard to take a bad picture of Jimi.”

Janis Joplin

Janis Joplin at home, San Francisco, 1967

This is one of my favourite quotes from the book. I can picture Baron having these conversations:

“People are always coming up to me, “Can I talk to you privately; I bet you have some great stories about what went on in those days?” I say, “Yeah I do,” and they say, “Well, what went on?” and I answer, “What do you think went on?” And they come back, “Yeah, yeah,” and I say, “Yeah!” I mean what do I tell them, that people were smoking pot? Of course they were smoking pot. That they were backstage making out? Of course they were. Did I see anybody destroy hotel rooms? No, and so what if they did, so what if I had seen it, what is there to see that I could tell them that they don’t already know? One question that is continually repeated is, “Hey, can I talk to you privately, tell me – it won’t go any further, just for me – did you sleep with Janis Joplin, just tell me, did you sleep with Janis Joplin?” And I always answer, “Well what do you think?” I either say it like this – “What do you think?” or “What do you think?” And they say, “Oh, man, thank you, thanks, I appreciate that, it means a lot to me.” I let them use their imagination; I never say anything more, never go beyond that response! Never did and never will.”

Mick Jagger and Anita Pallenberg

Mick Jagger and Anita Pallenberg on the set of Performance, London, 1968

It’s not fair. Really. Whilst complaining that he missed out by not getting a chance to live in Swinging Sixties London, Baron blithely explains how “…after The Who finished work in the studio Pete (Townshend) invited us for dinner and later decided we should go over to the film set in which Mick Jagger was shooting his new movie, ‘Performance’… The relationships were all a little complex; Anita was Keith’s girlfriend who had been with Brian Jones before and was now in a movie doing love scenes with Mick.”

Sigh.

Every Picture Tells A Story

Photographing Jann Wenner, San Francisco, 1968

“Every Picture Tells A Story – Baron Wolman, The Rolling Stone Years.” Its 176 pages are filled with photos and text. Some of the photos have never been seen; none of the words have ever been read – other than by me and the editors, of course. It’s a picture book with text, the stories behind the photos. For years I’ve been asked to talk about the photos, how they came to be, what happened on assignment at the various shoots. This book will answer those questions and more. I and my camera were fortunate to be around at a seminal time in the history of our country and the music business. The book is my “thank you” for the privilege.