Cosmic World Book Tour, Spain: Madrid

A slightly jet-lagged Baron sent in this report from Day 1 of the Cosmic World Book Tour, Spanish leg.

“Really loving the view from the balcony of my room. Had coffee with a Jamón ibérico & cheese sandwich down there. Weather and  people watching are both wonderful.” Baron was interviewed by El Pais today -we’ll update as soon as it’s online.

MADRIDFOTO

 

Baron is looking forward to presenting at MADRIDFOTO 4 International Contemporary Photography Fair, Matadero Madrid, June 7 – 10th, 2012.

Baron’s photographs will be with the Duncan Miller Gallery in an exhibition of photographs of American musicians and other icons.

Baron will also be signing books and will be giving his now-famous audio-visual presentation for the United States Ambassador to Spain – as you can see, a VIA – very important audience! Nos vemos en España!

Cosmic World Book Tour, Spain

Baron obliges a young fan at the Duncan Miller Gallery early on in the Cosmic World Book Tour

Baron is heading to Spain! After Duncan Miller‘s “American Icons” exhibition, June 8-10, Baron will head to Ibiza to give his now-famous audio-visual presentation, as well as signing The Rolling Stone Years book, and selling prints. Events take place at the Pike Hotel and Baron will be there from June 11-15.

Then it’s a short hop to Mallorca for Mark Robinow‘s exhibit, “A-wop-bop-a-loo-bop a-lop-bam-boom, Six Decades of Rock ‘n’ Roll” at the St. Regis Mardavall where Baron will also be selling prints and signing books. ¡únete a nosotros!

Richard Brautigan

Richard Brautigan, San Francisco, 1968

‘Jubilee Hitchhiker: The Life and Times of Richard Brautigan’ is out now at a retailer near you. Baron photographed Brautigan in 1968 and  in ‘The Rolling Stone Years‘ book Baron talks about how he “turned him (Jann Wenner) on to a poet named Richard Brautigan. “Jann, he’s writing this terrific poetry, kind of a hippie poet in a way but not really and I’ve got these great pictures of him.” Eventually Brautigan produced a poem in each issue; for a while he became the Rolling Stone poet laureate.”

Levon Helm

Levon Helm and Rick Danko, The Band, Winterland, San Francisco, 1969 © Baron Wolman

The death of Levon Helm was a sad loss; cancer has taken too many luminaries this year.

In The Rolling Stone Years book, Baron talks about photographing at Winterland in 1969:

“When I photographed The Band in performance on Winterland’s big stage it was virtually impossible to get the entire group into a single frame. I tried from a variety of angles but somehow the five of them were never arranged in such a way that I could fit them all into a good photo at one time. At the larger venues live photography presented considerable challenges, much different from shooting at the smaller clubs.”

Jimmy Page Guitars

Jimmy Page’s “heavy artillery,” Led Zeppelin, Day On The Green, Oakland Coliseum, CA, 1977

“I myself didn’t realize that this line-up of guitars belonged to the illustrious guitarist Jimmy Page. Embarrassingly, I didn’t even know that much about Led Zeppelin when I photographed them. I simply liked that they were a hugely photogenic band; to me that counted for a lot.” Baron Wolman, The Rolling Stone Years.

This brilliant color photograph of Jimmy Page’s guitars on-stage in 1977 is newly available, strictly limited in an edition of 50 prints. Each 16″ x 20″ fine art photographic print is individually numbered and has been hand-signed by both Jimmy Page and Baron Wolman!

Head over to Jimmypage.com for more details on owning one of these limited edition, highly collectible photographs.

© Dave Brolan

Rolling Stone Cover, Brazil

The cover of the Brazil edition of Rolling Stone Magazine, featuring Baron Wolman’s book, the ‘Rolling Stone Years: Every Picture Tells a Story.’ This photograph of Jimi Hendrix is the perfect archetype.

The magazine cover includes the photo of Mick Jagger on the set of ‘Performance’ in London, 1969; a photo of Jim Morrison taken in 1967 in San Francisco; Janis Joplin at her ‘Concert for One’ held in Baron’s studio; the classic Pete Townshend photo – Baron paid tribute to Pete when Baron received his Classic Rock VIP Award last year; plus Bob Dylan, and Jimmy Page. All these photographs are in the book, and prints are available.

The Allman Brothers Are Born

Allman_Brothers

L to R: Berry Oakley, Duane Allman, Dickey Betts, Butch Trucks, Jaimoe Johanson, Gregg Allman, Phil Walden

Baron recently received a phone call from a picture editor asking about his 1969 panoramic photograph of the Allman Brothers in a Macon, Georgia, recording studio. In March of that year while on assignment for Rolling Stone, Baron had indeed photographed the band during its first week of rehearsals together as the six piece group that manager/promoter Phil Walden helped launch. But Baron didn’t even have a panoramic camera at the time. It turned out that Phil Walden had created his own ‘panoramic’ by framing together the two prints Baron had given him. In March 2012, more than forty years later, this rendition of the Allman Brothers panoramic photo was created, a very limited edition, historically significant, print which you now have the opportunity to own.

Editions are available as follows:
24×16 inches, edition of 75
44×24 inches, edition of 15

Click here to inquire.

Photo Review

Jimi Hendrix, New York City, 1970

Australian magazine Photo Review just published an interview they recorded during the Antipodean leg of the Rolling Stone Years Cosmic World Tour. Some of the highlights:

PR: You’ve said that often you’d come away from shooting a concert and remember almost nothing of what had happened. Why is that?

BW: You had to be totally involved in the photographic moment. There was no autofocus, no auto-exposure, no auto-winders. Everything was done manually and you had to think it out in advance before you did anything. On stage the lights were always changing, and that meant the correct exposure was always changing too. I had a spot meter that looked like a machine-gun almost. I’d point it at the musician hoping that the reading I got then would kind of stay that way for awhile, you know. That was before there ever was a meter in the camera itself.

PR: So your mind is filled with the technical challenges while you’re shooting, then you come out of it and discover what you’ve done?

BW: Well, I knew that I could turn it on and off. I had to actually stop thinking actively about what I was doing and just let it come to me. You know, I felt like I was a conduit for these images to come through – wherever they were coming from – through me to the camera. I felt like I didn’t play a major role in it – obviously I did – but I felt somehow disconnected… I didn’t feel like I was responsible for the pictures; although obviously I was.