The Beat Goes On

At Gallery 270 this past weekend there was such a great turnout that we completely sold out of the books we’d brought along for signing! Baron’s adoring public have wiped him out!

You can still get yours, either one of our limited editions or the regular hard cover. Get a T shirt too while you’re at it – we’ll post your photos of you in the T here in the blog.

The Fotobaron, Gallery 270, Westwood, NJ © Olivia Taubner

On The Set Of Odd Thomas

L: Eric Amundsen; R: Mitch Amundsen. On set, July 25th, 2011. All images © Baron Wolman

The feature film “ODD THOMAS” is currently being shot in Santa Fe. The name is not the odd part – for me there were several unexpected and odd coincidences. First, Eric Amundsen, the film crew’s Digital Imaging Technician emailed me about the possibility of buying a copy of “The Rolling Stone Years” in Santa Fe. He had seen the photo of Janis Joplin playing pool in her Larkspur, California home in the summer double issue of Rolling Stone. We exchanged emails and Eric invited me to the set to watch the filming. Second, the location was the radio studios of Hutton Broadcasting here in Santa Fe, the offices of which are decorated with my photographs! Third, it turns out that Eric and his brother Mitch, the film’s Director of Photography, “were raised in Larkspur [California], played pool on Janis’s table in West Baltimore, listened to lots of San Francisco music and stared at your pictures.” And I lived for years in Mill Valley, the town directly adjacent to Larkspur.

It was fascinating to watch the movie being made, in particular because this movie is being shot entirely digitally. The lenses look the same, the cameras don’t. I exchanged “war” stories with the crew over the catered lunch, then watched how Eric works with the huge digital files, and began to understand how they are managed and transmitted. All fascinating stuff. Everybody on the set was hugely hospitable. Now I think I want to make a movie. Is this a great world or what…!!!

T-Squat Interview

View from the stage, Woodstock Music & Art Fair, Bethel, NY, 1969

Beck Rocchi & James Watkins over at T-Squat ran an extensive interview in their culture blog. Here’s a short excerpt:

T: Woodstock 1969 is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most pivotal moments in popular music history. Who or what blew you away over these three days?

B: What made Woodstock so unique for me wasn’t the music, although the line-up was extraordinary.  Rather it was the gathering of so many people in one place, at one moment in time, for the sole purpose of enjoying themselves and one another.  If you look at the pictures I took you will see I concentrated on the people not the performers.  There is one photo I shot standing pretty much in the middle of that enormous Woodstock stage, using the widest-angle lens I had at the time (24mm, I think) where I tried to capture the enormity of the crowd.  Even that lens didn’t include everybody.  I mean, think about it.  Here was a disaster waiting to happen – rain, mud, humidity, not enough food, insufficient sanitary facilities – and nothing untoward happened, no violence, no anger.  That single concert fulfilled the “hippie promise” of peace, love and music…

Lighting scaffold, Woodstock Music & Art Fair, Bethel, NY, 1969

Cosmic World Book Tour In LA

Continuing the Cosmic World Book Tour in Los Angeles, Klara, one of Baron’s fans, cozies up to the chief, no doubt elated by her purchase of a signed copy or two of “The Rolling Stone Years.” You, too, can touch Baron, just keep an eye on our tour dates!

This shot was taken with the Instax Mini, Fuji’s great little instant camera. Baron scanned the print himself.

Being Busy B

Message from Baron’s HQ:

Apologies to those who ordered books in Cleveland and haven’t received them yet. Baron will be back at his desk and will take care of your orders tomorrow.

Thank you for your patience!